First Climate Change Conference For West African Journalists: Expert says, 60m at Risk Of Sleeping Sickness In Sub-Sahara Africa Yearly

….70,000 in Nigeria – Climate Change Expert

A Lecturer with Shehu Idris College of Health Science and Technology, Makarfi, Kaduna, and Faculty of Vetenary Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Shuaibu Mohammed, Ameer, S. has revealed that there about 70,000 cases of sleeping sickness in Nigeria every year, and an estimated 6o million people are at the risk of the infection in sub Saharan Africa annually.

Shuaibu Mohammed who also lecture in kaduna State university, department of environmental management, raised the alarm Wednesday in kaduna in a paper presented at the First Annual Conference on Climate Change jointly organized by African Climate Reporters and Womenhood Foundation of Nigeria.

Titled: Climate Change and Parasitic Shift: Strategy for the Fulani of Northern
Nigeria, the expert noted that one of the consequences of climate
change is the shifting boundaries for many components and processes within the
systems.
“Climate change is a natural phenomenon that is characterised by global
warming, rising sea level and other extreme environmental events.
“Climate is essential to ecosystem services and stability. One of the consequences of climate change is the shifting boundaries for many components and processes within the systems”, he said.
He also said that among these components are pathogens and infectious diseases.
“Vector-borne diseases are particularly sensitive to warming because temperature changes can alter vector development rates, shift their geographical
distribution and alter transmission dynamics. “Trypanosome, a vector-borne
disease of humans and animals, was recently identified as one of the 12 infectious diseases likely to spread owing to climate change. It is the most critical
factor that limits the southwards migration of Fulani.
“ln Northern Nigeria, climate
change impacts are mainly flood, drought and rural urban migration”, he said, adding that
desertification in the far north; the expansion of the savannah in the middle belt and the contraction of the rain forest down south “may expand availability of pasture and distribution of tsetse fly.
The Fulanis and associated tribes, according to him, are the
custodians of over 90% Of cattle in Nigeria, stressing that “these cattle are the major sources of
meat and dairy products in Nigeria.
“The distribution of Fulani in Nigeria is determined not only by pasture and water but also by presence or absence of
cattle parasites such as trypanosome. Sleeping sickness, or African trypanosomiasis, has been identified as an infectious disease that is very likely to
be affected by climate change. It is caused by a parasite carried by Tsetse flies which infects the nervous system and, if untreated, is fatal. There are around
70,000 cases of sleeping sickness every year, and an estimated 6o million people in sub Saharan Africa are at risk of infection”, he said.
“This paper reviewed the life cycle of trypanosome, the migration pattern of the Fularni and suggests the possible environmental, public health and economic consequences of the parasitic boundary shifts”, he stated, saying the proposed
strategy of mitigation and adaptation requires the collaboration of all stake
holders for sustainability.
Also in a paper presented by Nurudeen Bello on “Effects of Climate Change in Nigeria”, stated that the adverse effect or impact of climate change such as temperature rise, erratic ranfall, sandstorm, desertification, low agriculture yields, drying of water body lake Chad basin, gully erosion and constant flooding are daily realities in Nigeria.
He said climate change also known as global warming refers to rise in average surface temperature on earth, saying and overwhelming scientific consensus maintained that climate change is due to human use of fossil fuel which released carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas estimates into the air.
“the gases trap heat within the temperature, which can have a range of effects on ecosystems including rise in sea levels, severe weathe event, drought that render landscape more susceptible to widefires”, he said, pointing out that the change is real, despite deniers by small minority voices questioning the validity of the assertion and prefer to cast doubt on the preponderance of evidence.
Earlier, guest speaker Dr. Yusuf Nadabo, Hod Anatomy Kaduna University on “The Important of Science Journalism”, enjoined Nigeria media practitioners to show more interest, commitment and zeal to science news and reporting as exemplified in western world for purposes of information and promotion of science research and encouragement.
According to him, science research, discovery and presentation without proper publicity remains a limbo and of little benefit to large public, saying valuable times spent to read extensively is what it takes to make a good science and climate reporter, and nothing to fear.
African climate reporters from French speaking neighboring countries and Nigeria, attended the event which took place at conference hall of the womanhood foundation of Nigeria office located at college road u/dusa, Kawo, Kaduna, Nigeria. They were spearheaded by Ibrahima of DW radio, while the founder of the foundation haj. Maryam Abubakar ward give award of credence by students union body from Northern region.

A Lecturer with Shehu Idris College of Health Science and Technology, Makarfi, Kaduna, and Faculty of Vetenary Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University Zaria, Shuaibu Mohammed, Ameer, S. has revealed that there about 70,000 cases of sleeping sickness in Nigeria every year, and an estimated 6o million people are at the risk of the infection in sub Saharan Africa annually.

Shuaibu Mohammed who also lecture in kaduna State university, department of environmental management, raised the alarm Wednesday in kaduna in a paper presented at the First Annual Conference on Climate Change jointly organized by African Climate Reporters and Womenhood Foundation of Nigeria.

Titled: Climate Change and Parasitic Shift: Strategy for the Fulani of Northern
Nigeria, the expert noted that one of the consequences of climate
change is the shifting boundaries for many components and processes within the
systems.
“Climate change is a natural phenomenon that is characterised by global
warming, rising sea level and other extreme environmental events.
“Climate is essential to ecosystem services and stability. One of the consequences of climate change is the shifting boundaries for many components and processes within the systems”, he said.
He also said that among these components are pathogens and infectious diseases.
“Vector-borne diseases are particularly sensitive to warming because temperature changes can alter vector development rates, shift their geographical
distribution and alter transmission dynamics. “Trypanosome, a vector-borne
disease of humans and animals, was recently identified as one of the 12 infectious diseases likely to spread owing to climate change. It is the most critical
factor that limits the southwards migration of Fulani.
“ln Northern Nigeria, climate
change impacts are mainly flood, drought and rural urban migration”, he said, adding that
desertification in the far north; the expansion of the savannah in the middle belt and the contraction of the rain forest down south “may expand availability of pasture and distribution of tsetse fly.
The Fulanis and associated tribes, according to him, are the
custodians of over 90% Of cattle in Nigeria, stressing that “these cattle are the major sources of
meat and dairy products in Nigeria.
“The distribution of Fulani in Nigeria is determined not only by pasture and water but also by presence or absence of
cattle parasites such as trypanosome. Sleeping sickness, or African trypanosomiasis, has been identified as an infectious disease that is very likely to
be affected by climate change. It is caused by a parasite carried by Tsetse flies which infects the nervous system and, if untreated, is fatal. There are around
70,000 cases of sleeping sickness every year, and an estimated 6o million people in sub Saharan Africa are at risk of infection”, he said.
“This paper reviewed the life cycle of trypanosome, the migration pattern of the Fularni and suggests the possible environmental, public health and economic consequences of the parasitic boundary shifts”, he stated, saying the proposed
strategy of mitigation and adaptation requires the collaboration of all stake
holders for sustainability.
Also in a paper presented by Nurudeen Bello on “Effects of Climate Change in Nigeria”, stated that the adverse effect or impact of climate change such as temperature rise, erratic ranfall, sandstorm, desertification, low agriculture yields, drying of water body lake Chad basin, gully erosion and constant flooding are daily realities in Nigeria.
He said climate change also known as global warming refers to rise in average surface temperature on earth, saying and overwhelming scientific consensus maintained that climate change is due to human use of fossil fuel which released carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas estimates into the air.
“the gases trap heat within the temperature, which can have a range of effects on ecosystems including rise in sea levels, severe weathe event, drought that render landscape more susceptible to widefires”, he said, pointing out that the change is real, despite deniers by small minority voices questioning the validity of the assertion and prefer to cast doubt on the preponderance of evidence.
Earlier, guest speaker Dr. Yusuf Nadabo, Hod Anatomy Kaduna University on “The Important of Science Journalism”, enjoined Nigeria media practitioners to show more interest, commitment and zeal to science news and reporting as exemplified in western world for purposes of information and promotion of science research and encouragement.
According to him, science research, discovery and presentation without proper publicity remains a limbo and of little benefit to large public, saying valuable times spent to read extensively is what it takes to make a good science and climate reporter, and nothing to fear.
African climate reporters from French speaking neighboring countries and Nigeria, attended the event which took place at conference hall of the womanhood foundation of Nigeria office located at college road u/dusa, Kawo, Kaduna, Nigeria. They were spearheaded by Ibrahima of DW radio, while the founder of the foundation haj. Maryam Abubakar ward give award of credence by students union body from Northern region.

33 Comments on “First Climate Change Conference For West African Journalists: Expert says, 60m at Risk Of Sleeping Sickness In Sub-Sahara Africa Yearly”

  1. Along with almost everything which appears to be building within this specific area, many of your opinions are generally rather radical. On the other hand, I appologize, but I can not give credence to your whole suggestion, all be it exhilarating none the less. It would seem to everyone that your opinions are actually not completely justified and in reality you are generally your self not even thoroughly convinced of the argument. In any event I did appreciate examining it.

  2. Great article and straight to the point. I am not sure if this is truly the best place to ask but do you people have any thoughts on where to employ some professional writers? Thank you 🙂

  3. I have been absent for a while, but now I remember why I used to love this blog. Thanks , I will try and check back more often. How frequently you update your web site?

  4. The other day, while I was at work, my cousin stole my iphone and tested to see if it can survive a 30 foot drop, just so she can be a youtube sensation. My apple ipad is now destroyed and she has 83 views. I know this is completely off topic but I had to share it with someone!

  5. I’m extremely impressed with your writing skills and also with the layout on your blog. Is this a paid theme or did you modify it yourself? Anyway keep up the excellent quality writing, it’s rare to see a great blog like this one today..

  6. Hiya, I’m really glad I’ve found this info. Nowadays bloggers publish just about gossips and web and this is actually annoying. A good blog with interesting content, this is what I need. Thank you for keeping this web-site, I will be visiting it. Do you do newsletters? Can’t find it.

  7. you are really a good webmaster. The site loading speed is amazing. It seems that you are doing any unique trick. Also, The contents are masterpiece. you have done a excellent job on this topic!

  8. The very heart of your writing whilst sounding reasonable initially, did not really settle well with me after some time. Somewhere throughout the sentences you were able to make me a believer but just for a while. I however have a problem with your jumps in logic and you might do well to help fill in all those breaks. When you actually can accomplish that, I would certainly be fascinated.

  9. I want to convey my love for your generosity in support of people who need assistance with this particular topic. Your very own dedication to getting the solution throughout ended up being exceptionally beneficial and has in every case encouraged associates like me to get to their goals. Your personal important information means a lot to me and much more to my office colleagues. With thanks; from everyone of us.

  10. A lot of thanks for your whole hard work on this web site. Ellie loves making time for internet research and it’s really obvious why. Most of us hear all regarding the powerful means you give powerful ideas on the web site and therefore strongly encourage response from some other people on that area of interest and our child is without question becoming educated a lot. Have fun with the remaining portion of the year. You’re doing a first class job.

  11. I have been surfing online more than three hours today, yet I never found any interesting article like yours. It’s pretty worth enough for me. In my view, if all webmasters and bloggers made good content as you did, the internet will be a lot more useful than ever before.

  12. Have you ever considered creating an e-book or guest authoring on other blogs? I have a blog based on the same ideas you discuss and would love to have you share some stories/information. I know my visitors would value your work. If you’re even remotely interested, feel free to shoot me an e mail.

  13. Thanks a lot for sharing this with all of us you actually know what you are talking about! Bookmarked. Kindly also visit my website =). We could have a link exchange agreement between us!

  14. Hey, I think your site might be having browser compatibility issues. When I look at your blog in Chrome, it looks fine but when opening in Internet Explorer, it has some overlapping. I just wanted to give you a quick heads up! Other then that, great blog!

  15. Together with every thing which appears to be building inside this particular area, all your viewpoints tend to be fairly stimulating. On the other hand, I beg your pardon, but I do not subscribe to your entire theory, all be it exhilarating none the less. It seems to us that your remarks are not completely justified and in actuality you are generally your self not thoroughly certain of the assertion. In any case I did appreciate looking at it.

  16. I’m really impressed with your writing skills as well as with the layout on your blog. Is this a paid theme or did you customize it yourself? Either way keep up the excellent quality writing, it’s rare to see a nice blog like this one nowadays..

  17. Hello, you used to write magnificent, but the last several posts have been kinda boring… I miss your great writings. Past few posts are just a little bit out of track! come on!

  18. Could you give me some smaller notes? how often do you need to take viagra Turn the conventional key – no pointless separate starter buttons here – and the engine burbles to life behind your head with a volume of mechanical chatter you rarely get in modern cars. Like the Mito and Giulietta, it has a DNA (Dynamic, Normal or All-weather) driving mode selector, which alters the operational parameters of the engine, transmission, stability control and electronic Q2 differential. I opted for the default setting for the initial road drive, saving the Dynamic mode for when we reached the hills.

  19. We are a bunch of volunteers and opening a new scheme in our community. Your web site provided us with useful information to paintings on. You’ve done an impressive process and our entire community might be grateful to you.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *